LIMBIC VOID

A brief biography

IT ALL BEGAN

in the mid-90s, discovering the wonderful world of music trackers

A large part of my formative years, the late mid-90s to early 2000, were spent playing in a band. Electronic music wasn’t cool back then, it was associated largely with cheap-sounding air-headed dance music and because of that I never wanted it to be part of my identity. I mainly spent my free time making music with music trackers and being part of the demoscene. I learned a lot from this and had a lot of fun at the same time.

With the emerging experimental electronic sound that suddenly became credible following the release of Radiohead’s Kid A in 2000, using electronic elements started becoming cool again. Even though my main focus still was acoustic music, I completed a bachelor’s degree in Music Technology at NTNU, so programming music was still part of my DNA.

After that, I had become tired of music altogether. The whole music scene had left me weary, so I quit and went on to start working with design and animation. For almost ten years, I stopped playing and producing (with a few exceptions) until around 2012 where I decided to rekindle my old passion.

Much had happened since I was active then, and luckily technology had made everything much easier. I discovered Reaper, which really spoke to me. After some experimenting, I decided I might as well start releasing some tracks and so Limbic Void was born. I sometimes regret the long break I took, but better late than never I suppose.

There’s a lot less time available to write and produce now than when I was in my twenties, but I’m in no hurry. I do this because I thoroughly enjoy it and try to think as little as possible about what others expect and want. If I have my way, Limbic Void will still be releasing tracks when I’m old and gray.

Photo of Limbic Void

Photo by Mikke Walle.

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THE WAY FORWARD

More experimentation, more collaborations.

The natural next steps for me is abandoning the commercial sounding production I’ve been practicing so far in order to explore more experimental soundscapes. I’ve rediscovered the fun of pushing synths and samples outside their comfort zone, and I feel as if my next release will take me in a slightly different direction.

Having been able to work with talented vocalists has also been a great experience and something I’d love to do more of. If you or someone you know should be interested, feel free to send me a sample of your work and I’ll be more than happy to give it a listen.

SEE DISCOGRAPHY